Club of Amsterdam Journal, April 2022, Issue 242

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CONTENT

Lead Article

DIY Light For Light On Main Street (especially during the pandemic)
by Leni Schwendinger

Article 01

Cities need to embrace the darkness of the night sky - here's why
by Nick Dunn, Lancaster University

The Future Now Show

Futurists about Sun & Light
with Elisabet Sahtouris & Peachie Dioquino-Valera

Article 02

Why the Sun is Necessary for Optimal Health
With Alexander Wunsch

News about the Future

> The liquid metal battery
> Forest seeks village to grow up in

Article 03

LightingEurope

Recommended Book

The Architecture of Natural Light
by Henry Plummer

Article 04

Traveling vehicle powered by water and wood
by Professor Pardal Brasil

Climate Change Success Story

Tarun Bharat Sangh

Visionary Architect Portrait

Peter Zumthor
Swiss architect


Tags:
ARCHITECTURE, Battery, Climate Change, Design,
Ecology, ENERGY, Light, Light pollution, Sun,
Sustainability, URBAN DEVELOPMENT, Water








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Welcome




Felix B Bopp


Website statistics for
clubofamsterdam.com
January 2021 - March 2022:
Visits: 600,000
Visitors: 117,000

 

Elisabet Sahtouris: "A biology that sees all nature as co-evolving holons [living entities] in holarchies [interdependent embeddedness] will quickly reveal much about humanity itself as one such holon-containing its own holarchy of individuals, families, organizations, communities, nations and world. Through this understanding of ourselves, we will gain profound insights on where we succeed and where we fail as a living system."

Henry Plummer: "One is solid and static, the other illuminates and animates. Architects through the ages have preoccupied themselves with how to marry these two opposing aspects of architecture, a marriage that at its finest transforms natural light itself into a building material."

Peter Zumthor: “I've said goodbye to the overworked notion that architecture has to save the world.”



Google:

The Meaning of light

Light is a source of illumination, whether a natural one (like the sun) or an artificial one (like your lamp). Like light itself, the word can take a lot of different forms — it can be a noun, an adjective, or a verb, and it can mean "bright" or "not heavy".

What is the meaning of light in our life?
Light, the essence of life itself. ... Light is the main source of energy for all living organisms. Plants, main sustainers of life, are crucial in this conversion process and need light for photosynthesis that enables them to make their own food and food for others.

What does light mean spiritually?
In theology, divine light (also called divine radiance or divine refulgence) is an aspect of divine presence, specifically an unknown and mysterious ability of angels or human beings to express themselves communicatively through spiritual means, rather than through physical capacities.

What is light energy?
Light energy is a form of electromagnetic radiation. Light consists of photons, which are produced when an object's atoms heat up. Light travels in waves and is the only form of energy visible to the human eye.


Lead Article

DIY Light For Light On Main Street (especially during the pandemic)
by Leni Schwendinger

 

 



Leni Schwendinger
Creative Director | Leader | Urban Lighting Designer | Nighttime Designer | Public Speaker

 

One evening, in 1927,Virginia Woolf stopped writing. She needed a pencil. Her short story, “Street Haunting: A
London Adventure” is a depiction of her high street/main street nightwalk in search of that writing implement.
" 'Really, I must buy a pencil’.As if undercover of this excuse we could indulge safely in the greatest pleasure of
town life in winter — rambling the streets of London.”

With requirements to maintain social distancing, many places are installing temporary measures to manage safety,
but also to encourage people back into city centers as part of their recovery plans.Therefore, it is perhaps not
surprising Tactical Urbanism – for example, parklets and painting streets – is in vogue. However, as is usual, most
current guidance and examples of tactical design responses assume daytime uses. With fraught reopening of
entertainment and hospitality sectors, the nighttime economy is a primary concern.

There is a perception that public realm lighting schemes must involve expensive equipment and installation.
Surprisingly, in my Manhattan neighborhood, the Covid-19 pandemic has generated transformative night, do-it-
yourself, lighting.This article is focused on quick, inexpensive DIY solutions.

This article responds to the basic US recommendations for updated street design due to the pandemic.

1. Reallocation of pavement space for walking and alternative mobility,
2. Enlarge sidewalks for distanced-dining areas,
3. Full street closure for micro-mobility and pedestrians


The ordinary storefront can provide a safe-feeling, attractive “street wall” for walking after sunset with thoughtful
displays and quality lighting. Extending the concept of an illuminated shop window into the pedestrian way, a
fresh approach is proposed for increased walkability and later open hours.

BE CREATIVE
Consider the fairy light...easy to procure, to handle, powers up at one end, and, comes in a multitude of shapes
and hues. From the tiniest seed lights to hi-tech color-changing globes, festoon lights are the ultimate DIY lighting
system. Design choices include bulb size, color, wattage (brightness), dimension offset, and cable pigment. Lantern
coverings can be added to the tiny bulbs for a more substantial look. Imaginative stringing – for example, weaving,
crisscrossing, and armatures for sculptural form – add a kind-of gravitas to this cheerful approach.

 

Rather than focus on functional qualities, also consider how lighting can be used creatively to create a welcoming
environment and contribute to place distinction.

For newly pedestrianized streets,or reallocated public space,another DIY application is to loosely wrap streetlights
with colorful theatrical “gel” filters, which will transform into immersive, tinted environments, strengthening
identity and enjoyment. Sheets of flexible filters can be purchased at a theatrical supply shop.



Photo: Xavier Boymond

COLLABORATE

Supplementary to festooning across streets, as is usual for holidays, lights can string from streetlight to street-
light parallel to pavement and store windows – defining entries and illuminating extended outdoor dining ar-
eas. Spacing string-light spectacles – across the street or parallel – could mirror the 6-foot condition. Pre-sock-
eted lengths of cable are available at light stores, or many local organizations will already have holiday lighting
stock. Here, we propose that creative, festive lighting could be brought into use to help with the recovery of
night-time economy.

Additionally, for greatest effect, shops and restauranteurs might collaborate on multiple lengths to encompass a
section of the road or even district. For visual quality, a designer or artist could be brought on board to define
products and patterns. Engage with local shop keepers to see how they might contribute.With solar-powered
LEDs available for little money, a group of businesses might quickly add to the visual quality of streets after
dark with installations in their shop windows. Collectively, the effects will be even more transformative.


WHAT NEXT?

Summing up, illumination strategies are made of an ephemeral tool kit: beam-spread shapes, brightness level,
and time.

LED streetlighting, in the future, will be managed by software. One can envision responsive public lighting to
dim for areas of dining, to allow restauranteurs to feature private light schemes or candles.Additionally, pools
of light can define physical distancing requirements.

More sophisticated design approaches are in our city futures... but for now, please consider the fairy light

 

© Leni Schwendinger 2022

 

Leni Schwendinger is an internationally acclaimed speaker who shares her journey as an artist-activist with audiences to spark their creativity.

Leni participates in global conferences, associations, and small groups as a speaker and leader engaging a variety of design genres. She conducts training and workshops, in-person and/or online.

Is night scary or poetic? Inviting or frightful? These questions speak to the challenges of utilizing outdoor spaces. Leni facilitates local community and stakeholder engagement with the NightSeeing™ Navigate Your Luminous City program in cities and towns worldwide. For example, in Cartagena, Colombia, her research team sought to discover methodologies to build stronger communities with light through a hands-on lantern prototype.

Leni’s objective is to expand social interaction and activity in public spaces. This ambitious challenge is shared with audiences through a dramatic discovery of light.




CONTENT

Article 01

Cities need to embrace the darkness of the night sky - here's why
by Nick Dunn, Lancaster University



 

 


Nick Dunn
Professor of Urban Design,
Lancaster University

 

Tungphoto/Shutterstock.com


As the coronavirus pandemic has moved around the world, cities have gone into lockdown and people have been encouraged to stay at home. In many places, curfews have been introduced.

Back in spring under the first UK lockdown, I went on numerous night walks in my home city of Manchester. I was struck by several things. Without traffic or trains, birdsong prevailed in this peculiar quietness. The air was fresh and crisp without the usual pollution. Yet, the artificial lights of the city at night still blazed, for no one.

Now, as England enters a second national lockdown, urban landscapes remain just as bright. It’s a similar situation around the globe, a powerful reminder of the wasteful ways we have become so accustomed to that we don’t even think about them.

Nightingale Hospital North West, city centre Manchester, November 8 2020.
Nightingale Hospital North West, city centre Manchester, 8 November 2020. Nick Dunn @darkskythinking/instagram


Light pollution is a big problem, not just because of the needless energy and money that it represents. Light is everywhere, an often-uninvited byproduct of our contemporary lives, shining from the devices we use and through the environments we inhabit.

Darkness, meanwhile, appears unwanted. How did we get to the point where if an urban landscape is not dazzling with light it must be troubling, even threatening?

From dark to light

Since the Enlightenment, Western culture has been closely bound with ideas of illumination and darkness as representative of good and evil. Shining a light on all things meant the pursuit of truth, purity, knowledge and wisdom. Darkness, by contrast, was associated with ignorance, deviancy, malevolence and barbarism.

Between the 16th and 18th centuries in Europe, for example, changes in attitudes and beliefs toward the night were important in framing perceptions of darkness that have endured. Transformations in societies gave rise to new opportunities for labour and leisure – which, coupled with the evolution of artificial illumination and street lighting, recast the night as an expansion of the day. Rather than being embraced, darkness was viewed as something to be banished with light.

Drawings of historical lighting devices.
Lighting through the ages. Wikimedia Commons

But this view was not necessarily shared by other cultures. For example, in his 1933 classic In Praise of Shadows, the Japanese author Jun'ichiro Tanizaki pointed out the absurdity of greater and greater quantities of light. Instead, he celebrated the delicate and nuanced aspects of everyday life that were rapidly being lost as artificial illumination took over:

The progressive Westerner is determined always to better his lot. From candle to oil lamp, oil lamp to gaslight, gaslight to electric light – his quest for a brighter light never ceases, he spares no pains to eradicate even the minutest shadow.

In the context of many city centres today, darkness is unwanted – connected to criminal, immoral and sinister behaviour. Yet recent research by engineering firm Arup has shown that some of these concerns might be misplaced. Further research has shown that cities need a better understanding of light to help tackle inequality. It can be used to promote civic life and help create urban spaces that are vibrant, accessible and comfortable for the diverse people who share them.

Meanwhile values of light, clarity, cleanliness and coherence in urban landscapes have been transferred across the global experience of culture more widely, resulting in a worldwide disappearance of the night sky.

The cost of light

This is not a small issue. Scientists are increasingly referring to this as a global challenge. The International Dark-Sky Association has shown that the waste in both energy and money is huge – in the US alone this adds up to $3.3 billion and an unnecessary release of 21 million tonnes of carbon dioxide each year. Of greater concern are the devastating impacts over-illumination and light pollution is having upon human health, other species, and the planet’s ecosystems.

The circadian rhythms of humans are disrupted by exposure to artificial light at night, making those working on-call, long hours or in shift work prone to diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity and gastrointestinal disorders. Britain’s night workers now account for one in nine employees, so this is a significant issue.

Millions of migrating birds become disorientated by electric lights, causing them to crash into buildings, while migrating sea turtles and beetles that use moonlight become disorientated.

It is clear we need alternatives – and quickly. Instead of reducing lighting pollution, new LED technologies actually increased it. This is because they have been rolled out with an emphasis on economic savings rather than scrutinised and applied with the nuance they are capable of in terms of array, colour, and power. Shifting the emphasis from quantity to quality is crucial so that we can appreciate different types of lighting appropriate to different contexts, such as the lighting scheme for Moscow’s Zaryadye Park, designed by US design studio Diller Scofidio + Renfro, which reflects existing sources of light.

River view at dusk with soft lighting.
Zaryadye Park, Moscow. Ekaterina Bykova/Shutterstock.com
"Moscow’s Zaryadye Park, designed by US design studio Diller Scofidio + Renfro"
Lighting by Leni Schwendinger Light Projects.

Valuing darkness

Dark skies have value. They are a profoundly wonderful yet highly threatened natural asset. It is unsurprising that people are increasingly rediscovering the joys of walking at night, whether in cities or the countryside.

We need a new conception of the dark and new visions for places that enable us to reconnect with the night sky through more responsible and less environmentally harmful lighting. Although intended as art, Thierry Cohen’s Villes éteintes (Darkened Cities) photographic series is powerful in the way it conveys how future cities could be with a more responsible and ecological approach to urban illumination. His photographs are a reminder of our connection to the cosmos and the dark skies many miss out on.

Among the complex and cascading issues that climate change presents, engaging with the potential of darkness in our cities is more important and urgent than ever before. Urban development around the world remains uneven and it would be easy to repeat and increase the problems we have already caused with light pollution. It is time for us to embrace the darkness. The Conversation

Nick Dunn, Professor of Urban Design, Lancaster University

 


This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license.

 

CONTENT

The Future Now Show

Futurists about Sun & Light
with Elisabet Sahtouris & Peachie Dioquino-Valera





The Earth's climate system depends entirely on the Sun for its energy. Solar radiation warms the atmosphere and is fundamental to atmospheric composition, while the distribution of solar heating across the planet produces global wind patterns and contributes to the formation of clouds, storms, and rainfall. (Google)


Elisabet Sahtouris
Holder of the Elisabet Sahtouris Chair in Living Economies at World Business Academy
Hawaii

 



 



Peachie Dioquino-Valera

Climate Reality Leader | Resource Speaker | Writer | Futures Learning Advisor | Consultancy (Community Dev.; Sustainability & Regenerative Design; Comms) | Conservationist | Citizen Scientist | Intuitive Counsel | COS Talent
Philippines

 

 

 

 




 


Credits

Elisabet Sahtouris
Holder of the Elisabet Sahtouris Chair in Living Economies at World Business Academy
Hawaii

worldbusiness.org/about/the-elisabet-sahtouris-chair



Peachie Dioquino-Valera

Climate Reality Leader | Resource Speaker | Writer | Futures Learning Advisor | Consultancy (Community Dev.; Sustainability & Regenerative Design; Comms) | Conservationist | Citizen Scientist | Intuitive Counsel | COS Talent
Philippines

www.climaterealityproject.org

 



Felix B Bopp

Producer of The Future Now Show

clubofamsterdam.com

The Future Now Show

https://clubofamsterdam.com/the-future-now-show



You can find The Future Now Show also at

LinkedIn: The Future Now Show Group
YouTube: The Future Now Show Channel



CONTENT

Article 02

Why the Sun is Necessary for Optimal Health
With Alexander Wunsch
University of California Television (UCTV)





Alexander Wunsch, MD, Wismar University of Applied Sciences, Germany gives a historical perspective on sunlight exposure and explains how both the public’s and medical community’s perspective has changed over time. Recorded on 12/09/2014. [3/2015]

Please Note: Knowledge about health and medicine is constantly evolving. This information may become out of date.

 

 

 

 

 



CONTENT

News about the Future


> The liquid metal battery
> Forest seeks village to grow up in


The liquid metal battery

Pellion Technologies is the leader in next-generation battery technology. Our technology aims to enable the next generation of mobile technology and make Li-ion obsolete by providing batteries with 50% higher energy density than current Li-ion. Our proven capability of over 1000 Wh/L has positioned Pellion to drive the next generation of devices.

 

 

 

 

 

Forest seeks village to grow up in

Iberdrola launches the 'Innovation and sustainability in rural areas' challenge, in collaboration with Start-up Olé and with the support of the European Commission. A pioneering programme to promote the recovery of natural spaces in depopulated areas of Spain and Portugal through the conversion of burnt land or wasteland into forests.

INNOVATION TO REFOREST VILLAGES IN SPAIN AND PORTUGAL

The 'Innovation and sustainability in rural areas' challenge aims to attract investment, create jobs and generate projects in rural areas that ensure a better quality of life and services for the inhabitants of these areas. Open to all municipalities with less than 15,000 inhabitants in Spain and Portugal, the programme will assess the sustainability, entrepreneurship and innovation strategy of the candidates, with special attention to the promotion of renewable energies and the decarbonisation of their economic activity.

To promote this initiative, the Iberdrola - PERSEO international start-up programme has the support of the European Commission and its strategic plan "A long-term vision for the EU's rural areas" through the REInA platform (Rural European Innovation Area), promoted by the University of Salamanca and managed by Start-up Olé. Detailed information can be found on the official website of the Startup village pledge.

 

 

 



CONTENT

Article 03


LightingEurope



 

LightingEurope is the voice of the lighting industry, based in Brussels and representing 30 companies and national associations. Together these members account for over 1,000 European companies, a majority of which are small or medium-sized, that manufacture luminaires, lamps and related components. They represent a total European workforce of over 100,000 people and an annual turnover exceeding 20 billion euro.

LightingEurope is committed to promoting efficient lighting that benefits human comfort, safety and well-being, and the environment. LightingEurope advocates a positive business and regulatory environment to foster fair competition and growth for the European lighting industry.


What we do

LightingEurope’s mission is to achieve the lighting industry’s Strategic Vision to deliver the value of lighting by 2025.

The lighting industry is harnessing the potential of LEDification and Sustainability and is delivering energy-efficient and sustainable lighting products.

The increased Value of Lighting to society will come from Intelligent Lighting Systems and Human Centric Lighting.

LightingEurope liaises with European legislators to share our members’ technical expertise and to help shape a healthy regulatory framework with simple rules that are better enforced, benefit people and the planet and foster a fair competitive business environment in Europe.

Click here for an overview of all EU Policies impacting Lighting.

 



CONTENT

Recommended Book


The Architecture of Natural Light
by Henry Plummer

 

 

 

Shelter and natural light are fundamental elements of architecture. The first is concerned with protection from natural elements; the second with the creative and sometimes spiritual interaction between the man-made and the natural worlds. One is solid and static, the other illuminates and animates.

Architects through the ages have preoccupied themselves with how to marry these two opposing aspects of architecture, a marriage that at its finest transforms natural light itself into a building material. Seen through the eyes of an architect and photographer, The Architecture of Natural Light is the first publication to consider the many effects of natural illumination in contemporary buildings. This comprehensive and thoughtful survey begins with a brief introduction exploring the advances and experimentation of architects throughout the centuries. Each of the following seven chapters is devoted to a specific quality of natural light, including evanescence, atomization, and luminescence, and examines the particular uses of light through many disciplines — from art history to film and literature. With more than fifty case studies of buildings from around the world, this volume considers works by some of the world’s most influential architects, including Tadao Ando, Steven Holl, Herzog & de Meuron, Peter Zumthor, Frank Gehry, Álvaro Siza, Alberto Campo Baeza, Rafael Moneo, Rem Koolhaas, Jean Nouvel, Fumihiko Maki, and Toyo Ito, among others.

For all those seeking to create space that transcends the physical, The Architecture of Natural Light is a powerful and poetic yet practical survey that provides an original and timeless approach to contemporary architecture.

 

 

 

Henry Plummer teaches architectural theory and design at the University of Illinois, and is an associate of the Center for Advanced Study there. He received his M.Arch. from M.I.T., studied light art with Gyorgy Kepes, and was a photographic apprentice to Minor White. He is the author of numerous books, most recently Masters of Light, First Volume: Twentieth-Century Pioneers.

 

THE ARCHITECTURE OF NATURAL LIGHT by Henry Plummer, Laureate of The Daylight Award 2020

 

 



CONTENT

Article 04


Traveling vehicle powered by water and wood
by Professor Pardal Brasil






CONTENT

Climate Change Success Story

Tarun Bharat Sangh | Bringing Change in Ecology


 

 

 

We dream of a world where dignified and self-reliant communities live in harmony with nature.



Our Mission

Tarun Bharat Sangh seeks to bring dignity and prosperity to the life of a destitute section of the nation through sustainable development measures. TBS aims for the holistic development of men, women, and children, regardless of economic situation, caste or religion. TBS promotes the community-driven-decentralized-management of the natural resources.


Objectives:

TBS is working for the empowerment of communities; we believe in Gram Swarajya- village self-rule. The unique part of TBS’s modus operandi for development is to make community self-reliance. This happens when you invite the community to participate at every stage of development-work for them.

  • Expansion or Restoration of social and cultural values by setting examples in welfare action.
  • Finding a balance between human and natural resource development.
  • Ensuring women participation in the process of decision making.
  • Improvement of the level of education in the community.
  • Incorporation of better health facilities
  • Energizing human power, especially youth power, to harness energy to value-based work.


Strategies:

  • The TBS strengthened by constant contact with local communities to evolve a method of working with the people. Its strategy gradually crystallized into five themes.
  • The effort has to be collective one from the community in which all would benefit proportionately from the improvement that would be planned.
  • The collective wisdom could be conceived in an atmosphere where informal communication took place, and every one had an equal opportunity to be heard.
  • All decisions would be strictly enforced, and the community would be its own self-disciplinarian.
  • Each person in the collective community would be individually responsible to carry out the tasks.
  • The community would only use outside help as a catalyst for their guidance and for the facilitation of the work processes.

 

 

 

 

 

 




CONTENT

Visionary Architect Portrait


Peter Zumthor
Swiss architect

 

 

 

Swiss architect Peter Zumthor at the Venice International Architecture Biennale in 2018. - Wikimedia

 

Peter Zumthor (b. 1943) is a Swiss architect. Among his best-known projects are the Kunsthaus Bregenz in Austria, the thermal baths in Vals in Switzerland, the Swiss Pavilion for Expo 2000 in Hannover (an all-timber structure intended to be recycled after the event) and the Kolumba Diocesan Museum in Cologne. Zumthor is the winner of several prestigious awards such as the 1998 Carlsberg Architecture Prize, the Mies van der Rohe Award for European Architecture (1999), the Praemium Imperiale (2008), the 2009 Pritzker Architecture Prize and the 2013 RIBA Royal Gold Medal. He lives and works in Switzerland.- Louisiana Channel

 

“I never decided to become an architect.” | Architect Peter Zumthor
Louisiana Channel

 

 

 

 



Therme Vals, Peter Zumthor - Wikimedia




Bruder Klaus Kapelle, Peter Zumthor - Wikimedia




Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011, Peter Zumthor - Wikimedia

 

 

 



CONTENT

 
 

Copyright © 2002-2022, Felix Bopp. All rights reserved.