Club of Amsterdam Journal, March 2022, Issue 241

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The Future Now Shows

 

CONTENT

Lead Article

What is the metaverse? 2 media and information experts explain
by Rabindra Ratan, Michigan State University and Yiming Lei, Michigan State University

Article 01

Bitcoin City

The Future Now Show

Hybrid Space
with Elizabeth Sikiaridi

Article 02

Digital Twin Cities

News about the Future

> New European Bauhaus
> Notpla

Article 03

Urban Spaces in a Digital Culture
With Gernot Riether

Recommended Book

Home in a Hybrid World
by Martin Pot

Article 04

Making the 'City in Nature' a reality
by Future Cities Lab Global / Singapore-ETH Centre

Climate Change Success Story

Global Forest Watch

Futurist Portrait

Greg Lindsay
Journalist, Urbanist, Speaker, Futurist


Tags:
Augmented Reality, Bitcoin, Blockchain, Children, Digital Twins,
EDUCATION, Forest, Humboldt Forum Berlin, Hybrid Space, MEDIA,
Metaverse, New European Bauhaus, Packaging, URBAN DEVELOPMENT,
Virtual Reality








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Welcome




Felix B Bopp


Website statistics for
clubofamsterdam.com
January 2021 - February 2022:
Visits: 561,000
Visitors: 103,000

 

Frans Vogelaar: "In the early 1990s, I started to develop a new field of study: hybrid space. This was twenty years ago the start of analog and digital space. At that time, I was very interested in networks, internet was still not yet public, but the concept of networks – social networks, mobility networks, etc.- was of course already known."


Greg Lindsay: “The future isn’t what it used to be. As the pace of social, technological, and environmental change accelerates, organizations are struggling just to make sense of the present, let alone spot threats and opportunities looming just over the horizon. The ability to anticipate, understand, plan for, and innovate around uncertainty has become a critical skill for designers, innovators, and strategists everywhere. (...)”


Rod Taylor, Global Director of the Forests Program: Before joining WRI, Rod worked as the Forests Director at WWF International. In earlier roles at WWF, he coordinated the World Bank/WWF Forest Alliance and led WWF’s forest work in the Asia Pacific region. Prior to his time with WWF, Rod worked as a forest policy adviser in Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.

Lead Article

What is the metaverse? 2 media and information experts explain
by Rabindra Ratan, Michigan State University and Yiming Lei, Michigan State University





Rabindra Ratan


Yiming Lei

 

The metaverse is a network of always-on virtual environments in which many people can interact with one another and digital objects while operating virtual representations – or avatars – of themselves. Think of a combination of immersive virtual reality, a massively multiplayer online role-playing game and the web.

The metaverse is a concept from science fiction that many people in the technology industry envision as the successor to today’s internet. It’s only a vision at this point, but technology companies like Facebook are aiming to make it the setting for many online activities, including work, play, studying and shopping. Facebook is so sold on the concept that it is renaming itself Meta to highlight its push to dominate the metaverse.

A book cover with a graphical representation of a massive stone gate with a pair of large unicorn friezes on either side, a futuristic cityscape on the far side of the gate and a male figure standing in the gate facing the city with a sword raised
The best-selling science fiction novel ‘Snow Crash’ gave the world the word ‘metaverse.’ RA.AZ/Flickr, CC BY

Metaverse is a portmanteau of meta, meaning transcendent, and verse, from universe. Sci-fi novelist Neal Stephenson coined the term in his 1992 novel “Snow Crash” to describe the virtual world in which the protagonist, Hiro Protagonist, socializes, shops and vanquishes real-world enemies through his avatar. The concept predates “Snow Crash” and was popularized as “cyberspace” in William Gibson’s groundbreaking 1984 novel “Neuromancer.”

There are three key aspects of the metaverse: presence, interoperability and standardization.

Presence is the feeling of actually being in a virtual space, with virtual others. Decades of research have shown that this sense of embodiment improves the quality of online interactions. This sense of presence is achieved through virtual reality technologies such as head-mounted displays.

Interoperability means being able to seamlessly travel between virtual spaces with the same virtual assets, such as avatars and digital items. ReadyPlayerMe allows people to create an avatar that they can use in hundreds of different virtual worlds, including in Zoom meetings through apps like Animaze. Meanwhile, blockchain technologies such as cryptocurrencies and nonfungible tokens facilitate the transfer of digital goods across virtual borders.

Standardization is what enables interoperability of platforms and services across the metaverse. As with all mass-media technologies – from the printing press to texting – common technological standards are essential for widespread adoption. International organizations such as the Open Metaverse Interoperability Group define these standards.


Why the metaverse matters

If the metaverse does become the successor to the internet, who builds it, and how, is extremely important to the future of the economy and society as a whole. Facebook is aiming to play a leading role in shaping the metaverse, in part by investing heavily in virtual reality. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained in an interview his view that the metaverse spans nonimmersive platforms like today’s social media as well as immersive 3D media technologies such as virtual reality, and that it will be for work as well as play.

Hollywood has embraced the metaverse in movies like ‘Ready Player One.’

The metaverse might one day resemble the flashy fictional Oasis of Ernest Cline’s 'Ready Player One,' but until then you can turn to games like Fortnite and Roblox, virtual reality social media platforms like VRChat and AltspaceVR, and virtual work environments like Immersed for a taste of the immersive and connected metaverse experience. As these siloed spaces converge and become increasingly interoperable, watch for a truly singular metaverse to emerge.

This article has been updated to include Facebook’s announcement on Oct. 28, 2021 that it is renaming itself Meta. The Conversation

Rabindra Ratan, Associate Professor of Media and Information, Michigan State University and Yiming Lei, Doctoral student in Media and Information, Michigan State University

 

 


This article is republished from
The Conversation under a Creative Commons license.


CONTENT

Article 01

Bitcoin City



Golf of Fonseca / El Salvador / Raúl Arias

With Bitcoin City, El Salvador plans to usher in a new era of digital education, sustainable energy reserves, and green mining. When the city becomes a reality, it will aim to achieve zero CO2 emissions and become a Bitcoin mining ecosystem driven by geothermal energy.

By integrating the latest technologies into the physical world, BTC City is turning into a genuine BITCOIN city which will be the first of its kind in the world to provide its visitors, consumers and business partners with an ecosystem that will develop and integrate advanced technologies based on state-of-the-art.

El Salvador's “Bitcoin City” would be funded with the issuance of a $1 billion Bitcoin Bond. The city will be located along the Gulf of Fonseca near a volcano.

What happens to El Salvador if Bitcoin crashes?
If the price of bitcoin falls, businesses will have to hike their prices. If it rises, then consumers lose buying power. El Salvador's government seems to recognize the problem: It's still paying public workers' salaries in dollars.

Source: Google

 

This Volcano-Powered 'Bitcoin City' is Coming to El Salvador
by Tomorrow's Build / 1 Feb 2022

 

 

El Salvador plans to use volcanic energy to create a Bitcoin city
by Al Jazeera / 28 Jan 2022

 

 

 

CONTENT

The Future Now Show

Hybrid Space
with Elizabeth Sikiaridi





Elizabeth addresses the multifaceted notion of hybridity. With the contemporary cultural shift and paradigm change - with the focus readjusting away from divisions and boundaries to interconnections and networks, we are experiencing today a proliferation of hybridizations in all dimensions of contemporary life.

Hybrid (combined physical and digital) spaces for communicating and living together are today rapidly developing. With hybrid space forming the core competency and focus of Hybrid Space Lab's long-standing engagement, the objective of our work is to filter out the best of both worlds, the physical and the digital, and combine these dimensions intelligently and effectively. The key here is to influence developments, by "inhabiting technology, approaching technological developments from a cultural perspective in order to transform technologies in such a way, that they correspond to the way we want to live as a society.

 

 




 


Credits

Elizabeth Sikiaridi
Co-Founder & P
artner of Hybrid Space Lab
architect, urbanist, professor
Berlin, Germany

Frans Vogelaar
Co-Founder & Partner of Hybrid Space Lab
Professor for Hybrid Space @ Academy of Media Arts
Berlin, Germany


Hybrid Space Lab is a think tank and design lab focussing on cultural innovation. "Hybrid" stands for interdisciplinarity, "Space" for spatial expertise and "Lab" for an innovative working method that favours a transdisciplinary design approach where city, nature and the digital - the technological and the biological - are thought and developed together.
hybridspacelab.net



Felix B Bopp

Producer of The Future Now Show

clubofamsterdam.com

The Future Now Show

https://clubofamsterdam.com/the-future-now-show



You can find The Future Now Show also at

LinkedIn: The Future Now Show Group
YouTube: The Future Now Show Channel



CONTENT

Article 02

Digital Twin Cities


 

The digital twin refers to the state of mutual symbiosis between digital entities and physical entities. Digital twin technology is a technology that integrates data, models, and physical entities. Digital twins refer to the mapping collection of entities in the digital world.

Digital 3D models can help city leaders plan for the future, but their value will depend on the data. This digital twin encompasses the current landscape of buildings, transit, trees, daylight and shadows, and points of interest.

New York City, Las Vegas and Chattanooga, Tenn., are among those using the technology to map out their cities and make them more efficient.

Shanghai, China's largest city, can now boast its own virtual clone. The digital twin covers almost 4,000 square kilometres and was created using information accessed from the real world, including satellites, drones and sensors. Beijing company, 51 World partnered with Unreal Engine to create Shanghai's clone.

Virtual Singapore integrates various data sources including data from government agencies, 3D models, information from the Internet, and real time dynamic data from Internet of Things devices. The platform allows different agencies to share and review the plans and designs of the various projects in the same vicinity.

Source: Google


 

Special Report: Digital Twin Cities

More than 500 cities around the world are expected to use urban digital twins in the coming years in their evolution toward digitally enabled growth. New digital platforms enable engineers and planners to stitch together multiple digital pieces into a whole, providing real-time physical and demographic information. Here is what some cities already are doing.

 

 

 

 

Digital Twins: Building Cities of the Future
The Pulse | Unreal Engine

 

 




How China Cloned Shanghai
The B1M


China has built a complete digital clone of its largest city covering almost 4,000 square kilometres - and it's about to simulate events in the future with astonishing accuracy. See how the team brought Shanghai's clone to life with Unreal Engine.


 

 

 




CONTENT

News about the Future


> New European Bauhaus
> Notpla


New European Bauhaus

The New European Bauhaus initiative calls on all of us to imagine and build together a sustainable and inclusive future that is beautiful for our eyes, minds, and souls. Beautiful are the places, practices, and experiences that are:

Enriching, inspired by art and culture, responding to needs beyond functionality.
Sustainable, in harmony with nature, the environment, and our planet.
Inclusive, encouraging a dialogue across cultures, disciplines, genders and ages.

Commissioner for Innovation, Research, Culture, Education and Youth, Mariya Gabriel, said: “The New European Bauhaus draws from Europe's culture, education, science and innovation to turn the promise of the European Green Deal into improvements for our daily lives. I look forward to seeing the best of European creativity come to life in this year's applications.”

 

 

Notpla

Notpla is a revolutionary material made from seaweed and plants. It biodegrades in weeks, naturally. We have created unique machines and materials to package your products in the most sustainable way.

Notpla is a sustainable packaging start-up founded in 2014. A combination of designers, chemists, engineers, and entrepreneurs. We create advanced packaging solutions made from seaweed and other natural materials as an alternative to single-use plastic.

Notpla, the material developed by Skipping Rocks Lab has expanded beyond just Ooho, and in 2019 the startup decided to give it a name and became Notpla.

A revolutionary alternative to single-use plastic sauce sachets has arrived! Our Heinz ketchup sachet looks like a little tomato – and naturally composts like one too.

They’re also super cool and easy to use, just nip a corner and squeeze!

The sachet itself is 100% natural, biodegradable, home-compostable and vegan. They can be disposed of (like fruit peel) in a kitchen food waste bin or home-compost after use and will disappear in as little as four to six weeks. You could (if you wanted to) even eat it!

 

 



CONTENT

Article 03


Urban Spaces in a Digital Culture | Gernot Riether
With Gernot Riether

 

 




Gernot has taught Architecture for about 20 years at several universities in the US and abroad, including Ball State University, Kennesaw State University, Columbia University and Georgia Tech and practiced in Architecture for 10 year in Europe and the US.


Information Technology is changing the physical public space. The talk illustrates how mobile devices and social media is changing the way we use public space and speculates on how public space maybe designed for a digital culture. Gernot Riether is the Director of the School of Architecture and Associate Professor at the College of Architecture and Design at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). He previously taught at Kennesaw State University, Ball State University, ENSA Paris La Villette, Georgia Tech, the New York Institute of Technology and Barnard College at Columbia University and is lecturing internationally.

Riether’s research explores the relationship between public urban spaces and information technology. Projects that he and his students designed and built in his Digital Design Build Studio won competitions and are featured in many books on digital fabrication. Riether is the author of over 40 refereed papers, articles and book chapters. His forthcoming book, Urban Machines, co-authored with architect Marcella Del Signore, explores the relationship between public urban spaces and information technology.He serves on the Board of Directors of CSU (Consortium for Sustainable Urbanization), a non-profit organization that is affiliated with UN Habitat and U.N. ECOSOC and on the Board of Directors of ACADIA (Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture). He is the editor of the Journal of the Design Communication Association (DCA).



Urban Spaces in a Digital Culture | Gernot Riether | TEDxNJIT




CONTENT

Recommended Book


Home in a Hybrid World
or to dwell in a networked environment
by Martin Pot

 

 

Whilst our outside world is modifying into a more complex and hybrid networked world, our most intimate dwelling, our home, is at risk of falling behind as for many it seems to have remained the same as it has been for many decades. This book explores what it means to have a home in such a networked world. It describes what architecture can, or perhaps should, contribute to enable a more participatory role for inhabitants. This forward-thinking book will try to answer the question - What is the role and position of technology in our most intimate locations both now and what could it be like in the future?

Summary:

This book is an attempt to synchronize three topics that - to me - are fundamental, timeless, as well as tightly connected; writing an adequate summary, thus, raises the question where to start. Given these three lines of its content, I will begin by referring to a most relevant statement: when, in 2014, philosopher Luciano Floridi published his provocative book "The Fourth Revolution," he argued in his "Ethics" chapter? "We shall be in serious trouble, if we do not take seriously the fact that we are constructing the new physical and intellectual environments that will be inhabited by future generations." In the year before the "Onlife Initiative" (OI) was presented, the result of a multi-disciplinary fundamental research commissioned by the European Commission (EC) and chaired by Floridi focused to rethink the digital agenda with an emphasis on human values. This research was, to a large extent, based on the works of Hannah Arendt; briefly, here, she emphasized the timeless value of private space, necessary to act in public space. During the discussions on the OI to discover its blind spots, I argued that it is architecture that articulates space; it creates a physical framing of public and private spaces, given its task of adapting space to human needs. The ultimate consequence is that we are aware of those needs and that we are capable of translating these needs into "physical and intellectual environments."

The actual problems in addressing both can be summarized as follows. First, the difference between private space and public space is increasingly blurred; while, in fact, most countries know a (legal) protection of private space, this is threatened by ever more digital intrusive developments. Second, in most countries, the issue of housing has become a system of commodities, a market-oriented system that excludes the inhabitant instead of a system of demand where the inhabitant has control over all aspects of his/her built environment. Third, the rapid increase of digital developments does not match the traditional and familiar aspects of "home," i.e., the need for a protective private space. As stated so adequately by Kas Oosterhuis in his "Foreword": "The material householder has the key to the front door, while the virtual home user has the password." Fourth, our dwelling ? i.e., our being at peace at a certain place at a certain time ? ultimately has no need for a physical entity first. To dwell is a work in progress, not a passive act depending on a fixed built environment.

Parallel issues: the current method of building our housing is far from participatory, far from flexible and adaptable, and far from sustainable. We build houses for inhabitants we do not know, in a society that is in constant change and in need of adequate answers to continuous developments that require awareness and participation. Our housing is considered and described as a fundamental right that provides it with an intrinsic value; the consequence is that we, as inhabitants, have a maximum agency in this. An important issue also concerns the topic of ownership, i.e., common and/or individual, be it the grounds on which we build or the infrastructure we need. Providing (future) inhabitants with maximum options to design and control their artificial surroundings is best served by keeping basic structures common and further infill individual. When basic (built) structure on common grounds is created in a sustainable way, it facilitates individual agency as well as controlled (common) infrastructure, allowing forms of co-creation that can realize active participating communities.

More in general: an addition to this is our attitude toward a society in change due to the awareness of the role of work, spare time, and issues like consumerism, pollution, and climate; in summary, the quality of life and environment. In 2003, Michelangelo Pistoletto created his "Third Paradise" as a "third phase of humanity, realized as a balanced connection between artifice and nature"; now, the recently launched ECs New European Bauhaus initiative seems an adequate sequel, building on Gropius 1919-statement of incorporating all arts in realizing "the new structure of the future." This also implies an emphasis on the more abstract since our life is not primarily about the ratio and efficiency; the consequence is a built environment that facilitates dwelling instead of providing houses and provides the framework for civil participation, imagination, and experience. It seems tempting to consider the housing situation as a technological problem since we so often believe or trust that technology will provide solutions, preventing us from thinking deeper. We can also not separate this from the parallel economic and political issues involved. Proceeding to action and practice: what is required now is the awareness that our private space/place, given its intrinsic value in human life, should not be subject to all anomalies of a volatile or disruptive market. What is needed is the appreciation that besides the fact that housing is a human right, it is the ground we build on that is/should be, in fact, common property, providing every citizen the opportunity to build within larger communities or individually. We need the opportunity, the place, and means to create and build a real example, i.e., the option to illustrate and prove that for innovative and participatory communities, a flexible framework will do, creating the prerequisites for an enriched life.

 

Martin Pot is researcher/interior-architect/writer/thinker. After Technical School Rotterdam he finished the WdKA - Academy of Arts in Rotterdam on Spatial Design; after a sidestep in digital cartography he completed the Hora Est-program at Erasmus University Rotterdam as preparation for a PhD on the subject of architecture, technology and dwelling. He has initiated and organized the six IoT & Built Environment conferences, later MeetUp's from 2011 to 2017 in Rotterdam. He writes regularly for various media about (interior)architecture, human values and technology.



CONTENT

Article 04


Making the 'City in Nature' a reality
by Future Cities Lab Global / Singapore-ETH Centre




To balance high-density and high-quality urban living, different perspectives have emerged in Singapore in creating a resilient city, says Dr Srilalitha Gopalakrishnan.




Designed by leading local studio WOHA, Kampung Admiralty integrates housing for the elderly with a wide range of social, healthcare, communal, commercial, and retail facilities. Photography: Darren Soh

 

Singapore’s aspirations to reinvent itself as a ‘City in Nature’ in line with the Singapore Green Plan 2030 gives a renewed focus to a system-based approach to urban landscape design practice for future developments, says Dr Srilalitha Gopalakrishnan.

In her recent interview with Southeast Asia Building (SEAB) Magazine, Dr Srilalitha, postdoctoral researcher and co-ordinator at FCL Global’s Dense and Green Cities module, looks at the progress of sustainable architecture in Singapore, and analyses areas for future improvement.

As president of the Singapore Institute of Landscape Architects, Dr Srilalitha is well-placed to discuss the changes in landscape architecture over the last five years. Not only has landscape architecture in Singapore focused on the increased value of pervasive greenery on buildings and intensifying urban greenery, there is an increasing awareness of urban landscapes as ecological nodes. All this bodes well for a whole-systems approach to landscape architecture practice.

Looking at the future of sustainable architecture in Singapore, projects such as the Tengah Township and Jurong Lake District, offer interesting visions of sustainable urban planning and living. As climate change and urbanisation continue to impact Singapore, Dr Srilalitha hopes that a circular product and waste cycle can be adopted by landscape product manufacturers. She also envisions greater collaboration between the product industry, architectural firms, educational institutes and research labs to bridge the gap between research and practice.

Read the full article on SEAB Magazine here (p. 48-51) (PDF, 30.3MB)




CONTENT

Climate Change Success Story

Global Forest Watch


 

 

Global Forest Watch (GFW) is an online platform that provides data and tools for monitoring forests. By harnessing cutting-edge technology, GFW allows anyone to access near real-time information about where and how forests are changing around the world.


Global Forest Watch | Monitoring Forests in Near Real Time

For the first time, Global Forest Watch unites satellite technology, open data, and crowdsourcing to guarantee access to timely and reliable information about forests.

Armed with the latest information from Global Forest Watch, governments, businesses and communities can halt forest loss.

Global Forest Watch was created by the World Resources Institute with over 40 partners, including: Google, ESRI, the University of Maryland, Imazon, Center for Global Development, and the U.N. Environment Programme (UNEP). Major funders include the Norwegian Climate and Forests Initiative, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), U.K. Department for International Development (DFID), Global Environment Facility (GEF), and the Tilia Fund.

 


Global Forest Watch Blog

Stay atop the latest forest research and news! The Global Forest Watch blog uses data to illuminate the state of forests worldwide and tells the stories of people dedicated to protecting them. Read about rainforests, deforestation, fires, sustainable agriculture, forest management and other topics critical to the future of forests.




Illegal logging on Pirititi indigenous amazon lands. Felipe Werneck/Ibama

Primary Rainforest Destruction Increased 12% from 2019 to 2020



Stripped earth at an Arco Minero gold mine in Venezuela. Photo by Vilisa Morón-Zambrano.

Venezuelan People and Forests Suffer as Gold Mining Advances

 



Rainforest in Papua, Indonesia. The country is one of the only nations reducing its deforestation rates. Photo by WidodoMargotomo/Wikimedia Commons

2021 Must Be a Turning Point for Forests. 2020 Data Shows Us Why

 

Forest Watcher

The Forest Watcher mobile app brings the dynamic online forest monitoring and alert systems of Global Forest Watch offline and into the field. Monitor areas of interest, view deforestation and fires alerts, navigate to a point to investigate, and collect information about what you find, regardless of connectivity.

 

Global Forest Watch Pro

GFW Pro was designed with leading companies and financial institutions to translate geospatial data into actionable insights. Platform capabilities include:

  • Monitor conditions at farms, supply sheds or jurisdictions and track changes over time

  • Demonstrate compliance with commitments and policies

  • Share data and analyses with colleagues, clients and customers through secure workflows

 

 

 




CONTENT

Futurist Portrait


Greg Lindsay
Journalist, Urbanist, Speaker, Futurist

 

 

After more than a decade’s experience writing about media, technology, travel, and design, my book “Aerotropolis: The Way We’ll Live Next” (FSG, 2011) led to a refined focus on the future of cities, mobility, work, and innovation. Time magazine’s Pico Iyer called my book “dazzling,” The New Yorker’s Nicholas Lemann found it “enthralling,” and Bloomberg BusinessWeek pronounced it a “fascinating and important work.”

I’ve since studied, written and spoke at length about the intersection of cities and the pandemic, remote work, innovation, immigration, climate change, demographics, and transportation. Recent projects have explored how delivery-only “ghost kitchens” and “dark stores” are disrupting retail, real estate, and the vitality of street life; the “Millennial dilemma” as a generation of Americans reaching middle age struggle to raise families and own homes; how all-in-one “super apps” are transforming banking, e-commerce, and transportation in Southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa — and soon, the Global North; how previous patterns of mixed-use real estate have been upended by pandemic-fueled changes in lifestyle, work, and consumption; and how climate change and migration will transform cities, regions, and nations.

Past speaking engagements include 10 Downing St., the U.S. State Department, the United States Military Academy, Sandia National Laboratories, the OECD, Harvard Business School, the MIT Media Lab, and numerous public and private universities. I’ve also advised such companies as Intel, Samsung, Starbucks, IKEA, Audi, Chrysler, Tishman Speyer, British Land, Emaar, André Balazs Properties, Expo 2020, along with numerous G20 government entities.

My work with Studio Gang Architects on the future of suburbia was displayed in 2012 at New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), and other works have been displayed at the 15th, 16th, and 17th Venice Architecture Biennales, the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, and Habitat III.

In 2019, I moved to Montréal to become the director of applied research at NewCities, along with director of strategy at its mobility-focused sister organization, CoMotion. I’ve since stepped back into a senior fellow role at the former to broaden my scope of activities, including my work as a senior fellow at MIT’s Future Urban Collectives Lab and a non-resident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Scowcroft Strategy Initiative.



The City of Tomorrow - Greg Lindsay

 


 


Greg Lindsay on Planning Cities Around the Known Unknown

 

 

 



CONTENT

 
 

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