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Books about the future of Architecture

. Books about the future of Architecture


The Weight of the Image : Teaching Design and Computing in Architecture
by Lars Spuybroek, Bob Lang, Nederlands Architectuurinstituut, Netherlands) International Nai Summer Master Class 1999 Rotterdam

The radical restructuring of the field of architecture made possible by recent developments in computer design cannot be understated-for the first time in history architects have been able to move from a top-down vision to a more organic, bottom-up vision. The 'insect-view' model developed by the ancient Greeks projecting grids on to the face of the earth is clearly the most enduring example of this top-down order, which has been slightly modified by Renaissance perspective and then Modernist collage. Now, in the era of cyber-design, architects have the opportunity to plan works where order is not imposed form up above, but instead emerges from the inside out. The Weight of the Image documents the fourth Master Class organized at the Netherlands Architecture Institute, where Lars Spuybroek (of NOX) and Bob Lang (Ove Arup) have developed a lucid and intelligent method of design where the 'emerging view' and the 'projected view' constantly alternate, and in the book they explain the procedure in full detail.


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Towards a New Architecture

by Le Corbusier

This pioneering proclamation by the great architect expounds Le Corbusier’s technical and aesthetic theories, views on industry, economics, the relation of form to function, "mass-production spirit," and much more. Profusely illustrated with over 200 line drawings and photographs of Le Corbusier’s buildings and other important structures.


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Giuseppe Terragni: Transformations, Decompositions, Critiques

by Peter Eisenman, Giuseppe Terragni, Manfredo Tafuri

An in-depth study of two of Italian rationalist architect Giuseppe Terragni's masterworks.
Peter Eisenman is principal of Eisenman Architects in New York, Louis I. Kahn Professor of Architecture at Yale University, the author of a great number of books and articles, and the subject of many others, including Blurred Zones: Eisenman Architects 1988–1998.


Earth Moves: The Furnishing of Territories (Writing Architecture)

by Bernard Cache, Anne Boyman (Translator), Michael Speaks (Editor)

Earth Moves, Bernard Cache's first major work, conceptualizes a series of architectural images as vehicles for two important developments. First, he offers a new understanding of the architectural image itself. Following Gilles Deleuze and Henri Bergson, he develops an account of the image that is nonrepresentational and constructive - images as constituents of a primary, image world, of which subjectivity itself is a special kind of image. Second, Cache redefines architecture as the art of the frame, extending architecture beyond building proper to include cinematic, pictorial, and other framings. Complementary to this classification, Cache offers what is to date the only Deleuzean architectural development of the "fold," a form and concept that has become important over the last few years. For Cache, as for Deleuze, what is significant about the fold is that it provides a way to rethink the relationship between interior and exterior, between past and present, and between architecture and the urban.

Bernard Cache (1958) graduated at the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, the Institut de Philosophie, under the direction of Gilles Deleuze, and at the Ecole Supérieure des Sciences Economiques et Commerciales. He is the founder of the Digital Production Workshop (Master Program) at the Escuela Superior d’Arquitectura in Barcelona and was its director from 2000-2001. He has been teaching at the University of Toronto, the University of Paris, and the Institut Français de la Presse. In 2002 Cache founded the Architecture Office Objectile, a digital architecture lab creating tools and technologies needed for non-standard design and manufacture.

On Growth, Form and Computers

by Sanjeev Kumar (Editor), Peter Bentley (Editor)

Conceived for both computer scientists and biologists alike, this collection of 22 essays highlights the important new role that computers play in developmental biology research. Essays show how through computer modeling, researchers gain further insight into developmental processes. Featured essays also cover their use in designing computer algorithms to tackle computer science problems in areas like neural network design, robot control, evolvable hardware, and more. Peter Bentley, noted for his prolific research on evolutionary computation, and Sanjeev Kumar head up a respected team to guide readers through these very complex and fascinating disciplines.



 

ICONOCLASH: Beyond the Image Wars in Science, Religion and Art

by Bruno Latour (Editor), Peter Weibel (Editor)


This book, which accompanies a major exhibition at the Center for New Art and Media (ZKM) in Karlsruhe, Germany, invokes three disparate realms in which images have assumed the role of cultural weapons. Monotheistic religions, scientific theories, and contemporary arts have struggled with the contradictory urge to produce and also destroy images and emblems. Moving beyond the image wars, ICONOCLASH shows that image destruction has always coexisted with a cascade of image production, visible in traditional Christian images as well as in scientific laboratories and the various experiments of contemporary art, music, cinema, and architecture. While iconoclasts have struggled against icon worshippers, another history of iconophily has always been at work. Investigating this alternative to the Western obsession with image worship and destruction allows useful comparisons with other cultures, in which images play a very different role. ICONOCLASH offers a variety of experiments on how to suspend the iconoclastic gesture and to renew the movement of images against any freeze-framing. The book includes major works by Art & Language, Willi Baumeister, Christian Boltanski, Daniel Buren, Lucas Cranach, Max Dean, Marcel Duchamp, Albrecht Dürer, Lucio Fontana, Francisco Goya, Hans Haacke, Richard Hamilton, Young Hay, Arata Isozaki, Asger Jorn, Martin Kippenberger, Imi Knoebel, Komar & Melamid, Joseph Kosuth, Gordon Matta-Clark, Tracey Moffat, Nam June Paik, Sigmar Polke, Stephen Prina, Man Ray, Sophie Ristelhueber, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and many others.

Architectures of Time: Toward a Theory of the Event in Modernist Culture

by Sanford Kwinter

In Architectures of Time, Sanford Kwinter offers a critical guide to the modern history of time and to the interplay between the physical sciences and the arts. Tracing the transformation of twentieth-century epistemology to the rise of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, Kwinter explains how the demise of the concept of absolute time, and of the classical notion of space as a fixed background against which things occur, led to field theory and a physics of the "event." He suggests that the closed, controlled, and mechanical world of physics gave way to the approximate, active, and qualitative world of biology as a model of both scientific and metaphysical explanation. Kwinter examines theory of time and space in Einstein's theories of relativity and shows how these ideas were reflected in the writings of the sculptor Umberto Boccioni, the town planning schema of the Futurist architect Antonio Sant'Elia, the philosophy of Henri Bergson, and the writings of Franz Kafka. He argues that the writings of Boccioni and the visionary architecture of Sant'Elia represent the earliest and most profound deployments of the concepts of field and event. In discussing Kafka's work, he moves away from the thermodynamic model in favor of the closely related one of Bergsonian durée, or virtuality. He argues that Kafka's work manifests a coherent cosmology that can be understood only in relation to the constant temporal flux that underlies it.


Linked: How Everything Is Connected to Everything Else and What It Means

by Albert-Laszlo Barabasi

How is the human brain like the AIDS epidemic? Ask physicist Albert-László Barabási and he'll explain them both in terms of networks of individual nodes connected via complex but understandable relationships. Linked: The New Science of Networks is his bright, accessible guide to the fundamentals underlying neurology, epidemiology, Internet traffic, and many other fields united by complexity.
Barabási's gift for concrete, nonmathematical explanations and penchant for eccentric humor would make the book thoroughly enjoyable even if the content weren't engaging. But the results of Barabási's research into the behavior of networks are deeply compelling. Not all networks are created equal, he says, and he shows how even fairly robust systems like the Internet could be crippled by taking out a few super-connected nodes, or hubs. His mathematical descriptions of this behavior are helping doctors, programmers, and security professionals design systems better suited to their needs. Linked presents the next step in complexity theory--from understanding chaos to practical applications. - Rob Lightner


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Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience

by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

You have heard about how a musician loses herself in her music, how a painter becomes one with the process of painting. In work, sport, conversation or hobby, you have experienced, yourself, the suspension of time, the freedom of complete absorption in activity. This is "flow," an experience that is at once demanding and rewarding--an experience that Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi demonstrates is one of the most enjoyable and valuable experiences a person can have. The exhaustive case studies, controlled experiments and innumerable references to historical figures, philosophers and scientists through the ages prove Csikszentmihalyi's point that flow is a singularly productive and desirable state. But the implications for its application to society are what make the book revolutionary.



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Information and the Internal Structure of the Universe: An Exploration Into Information Physics

by Tom Stonier

The first of a planned trilogy, this book examines the proposition that "Information" is as much a part of the physical universe as energy and matter. The acceptance of such a proposition has profound implications for the physical sciences; it also lays the foundations for a general theory of information. This book is directed firstly at researchers in information theory and scientists in other disciplines. However, its relatively non-mathematical nature and accessible writing style place it at the "scientific" end of the spectrum of popular science books. A general theory of information will emerge in the second volume; the third will examine the mechanism and evolution of human and machine intelligence.

 

Warped Space: Art, Architecture, and Anxiety in Modern Culture

by Anthony Vidler

Beginning with agoraphobia and claustrophobia in the late nineteenth century, followed by shell shock and panic fear after World War I, phobias and anxiety came to be seen as the mental condition of modern life. They became incorporated into the media and arts, in particular the spatial arts of architecture, urbanism, and film. This "spatial warping" is now being reshaped by digitalization and virtual reality. Anthony Vidler is concerned with two forms of warped space. The first, a psychological space, is the repository of neuroses and phobias. This space is not empty but full of disturbing forms, including those of architecture and the city. The second kind of warping is produced when artists break the boundaries of genre to depict space in new ways. Vidler traces the emergence of a psychological idea of space from Pascal and Freud to the identification of agoraphobia and claustrophobia in the nineteenth century to twentieth-century theories of spatial alienation and estrangement in the writings of Georg Simmel, Siegfried Kracauer, and Walter Benjamin. Focusing on current conditions of displacement and placelessness, he examines ways in which contemporary artists and architects have produced new forms of spatial warping. The discussion ranges from theorists such as Jacques Lacan and Gilles Deleuze to artists such as Vito Acconci, Mike Kelley, Martha Rosler, and Rachel Whiteread. Finally, Vidler looks at the architectural experiments of Frank Gehry, Coop Himmelblau, Daniel Libeskind, Greg Lynn, Morphosis, and Eric Owen Moss in the light of new digital techniques that, while relying on traditional perspective, have radically transformed the composition, production, and experience - perhaps even the subject itself - of architecture.


Asymptote: Flux

by Lise Anne Couture (Author), Hani Rashid

Asymptote, an award-winning New York City-based architectural firm, expands the boundaries of traditional practice with work that ranges from buildings and urban design to computer-generated environments. Recognized internationally as both cutting-edge architects and virtual-reality artists, Asymptote partners Lise Anne Couture and Hani Rashid have designed and written the first book to document their 'real world' (as opposed to virtual) projects completed since 1995. It includes work as diverse as a trading floor for the New York Stock Exchange; a multimedia research park in Kyoto, Japan; a modular furniture system for Knoll; and a centre for art and technology for the Guggenheim Museum in Soho, New York.

Rashid and Couture's work is intriguing because it draws inspiration from a wide range of sources not traditionally associated with architecture - among them the design of airline interiors, sporting equipment, and organic systems like seashells and honeycombs; and various means of communicating and disseminating information. Asymptote presents a seamless trajectory of projects organized in a non-linear fashion and illustrated with installation photographs, collaged photographs, and computer-generated diagrams and environments. The projects are interspersed with descriptive text and the speculative writing that Asymptote is known for.

Both partners combine architectural practice with teaching, Rashid at Columbia University and Couture at Columbia and Parsons School of Design.



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Reflexive Architecture

by Neil Spiller

This volume announces the onset of a new era in architecture. It represents a redefinition of the architectural possibilities that were first opened up by Neil Spiller in his successful cyberspace titles of the late 90s. By looking beyond the present perception of buildings as static architectural objects, Spiller and his contributors concentrate on the potential of buildings to employ dextrous, cutting-edge technologies to create architecture that is reflexive. That is architecture which is highly responsive and intelligent, able to translate and connect to its contextual and environmental surroundings at a new level, while also operating in three or more spaces simultaneously. It is effectively an architecture that is wholly visionary rather than being grounded by the limitations of the present.



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